This Week @ Liberty – February 20, 2017

Hoots, Howls, and Hollers

Robert Mesta

Robert Mesta – Non-Eagle Feather Program Coordinator

Guest Blog 2-20-17 by Robert Mesta

Every year Pectoral Sandpipers, a medium sized shorebird, travel from their Arctic tundra breeding grounds to winter in the pampas grasslands of Argentina, an 18,000-mile round-trip. On their annual migration, they fly over portions of 3 hemispheres, two continents and 36 countries, using critical stop-over areas; fresh and saltwater marshes, mudflats and wet meadows to rest and refuel to continue their journey. They are a fall migrant in Arizona, best seen in Maricopa County during the month of September.

Birds did not evolve to recognize political boundaries for their survival, yet they depend on countries along their migration routes to protect and preserve their full life-cycle habitats; breeding, wintering and stop-over, for their existence. Understanding the complex movements and habitat needs of these long-distance migrants is the foundation upon which countries develop range-wide conservation plans to maintain sustainable bird populations.

A significant source of that critical information is the citizen driven Christmas Bird Count Program (CBC). The CBC is one of the oldest and largest active data bases of bird population information, it is an invaluable resource for understanding the long-term trends in bird movements and population status.

Native Future is a non-profit organization that helps preserve the inextricable link between indigenous people and the ecosystems in which they live. Native Future is partnering with the Wounaan people of Panama’s Darian tropical rainforest to conduct the first Wounaan Community based CBC in the winter of 2017-2018. Since early 2016 I have been part of a Native Future team that is donating their time and resources to plan the CBC, train participating Wounaan Community members, and conduct the CBC.

To make this CBC project a reality we need optical equipment for the participating Wounaan. Therefore, I am making an appeal to all friends of Liberty Wildlife for the donation of any binoculars, spotting scopes, or tripods that you are no longer using and would like to donate to a good cause.

If you would like to donate any of your old optical equipment or have any questions about the Wounaan Community CBC Project, please contact me, Robert Mesta, LWNEFR Coordinator at robertm@libertywildlife.org. Better yet, drop by the Feather room and we can chat.

Sometimes we must reach out and support distant peoples and landscapes to help preserve the birds we enjoy on our weekend birding trips or even our own back yards.

Keep Soaring – Robt

This Week @ Liberty

The intake total for the year is now up to 270.

Posted by Terry Stevens - Operations Director

Posted by Terry Stevens
- Operations Director

It’s been a wet couple of days again as our brief winter hangs on a bit longer. It’s difficult to complain about the rain and cold weather when we all know that in a very short time we’ll long for days of clouds and cool winds…but the desert is our home and we’re adaptable. We’ll make the best of whatever nature throws our way.
Currently we’re caring for three California Condors, all of which present symptoms of lead poisoning. The other species are beginning to come in with a little more regularity and our new “Intake Window” volunteers are seeing an incremental increase in traffic. Hummingbirds are still arriving as are bunnies and the ubiquitous great horned owls and red tail hawks.
We are also continuing to retrieve the last few usable items from the Scottsdale facility and bring them south to our new home at the Rob and Melani Walton Campus of Liberty Wildlife.  It’s beginning to look like a ghost town up north but we still have some stuff that will be heading our way. Opening to the public is working nicely as even with threatening skies (and more!), we had a bunch of folks come out to see what we’re doing last weekend. Just wait until word gets out and the weather turns nice again!
Let’s see what it looked like last week…

Young condor in treatment

Young condor in treatment

Hoping for a lead-free future

Hoping for a lead-free future

Dr. Orr Jan and Alex treat a condor

Dr. Orr Jan and Alex treat a condor

They really are pretty birds

They really are pretty birds…

As a ban on lead ammunition on federal land is considered in Congress, we continue to treat California condors who suffer from this. And if the plight of California condors doesn’t move you, think of this: over time, we have seen many more eagles of both species suffer protracted painful deaths from ingestion of lead bullet fragments. (Eagles…you know, the symbol of our country? The bird that dominates the logo on the seal of the NRA? That eagle?) But then again, using cheaper (in some cases) ammunition is obviously easier than caring about America’s national bird. The voluntary program offered by AZGFD seems to be producing results and is to be commended.

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Gaping hummer

Gaping hummer

I’m not sure how people even find baby humming birds, but they do. And who knew they gaped when they are nestlings? This just shows that all species, from the largest to the smallest get complete care at Liberty Wildlife!

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People even come out in the rain

People even come out in the rain

Marko carries on inside

Marko carries on inside

Our public access program seems to be working as even in the rain and cold last weekend, people came out to visit the facility. Between rain events, the folks were able to walk around and tour the enclosures on the Education side, but in deference to any continued precipitation, the wildlife presentations were moved into the big classroom.

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The old office(s)

The old office(s)

The old ICU

The old ICU

Just a couple of shots of what the old facility looks like as we approach the final “Last person out” stage of our presence at 11825 N 70th in Scottsdale. It’s amazing how much stuff you accumulate in 36 years, and the memories of all that happened and all we did still hang like echos in the wind. What we used to accomplish in these two rooms is now done in separate rooms dedicated to the tasks. Progress is rarely easy, and never cheap!

The old Ed trailer moves to the new facility

The old Ed trailer moves to the new facility

Tim finally gets the "Ed Trailer" on the road

Tim finally gets the “Ed Trailer” on the road

One of the major accomplishments in the process of vacating our old facility was moving the old”Education Trailer” that sat alongside the walkway inside the front gate. We are going to use this as weather-proof storage for various materials at the new facility. Moving it was no small task and took Herculean effort and great perseverance on the part of Tim who kept doggedly gnawing on the governmental red-tape and mechanical logistics that seemed to thwart every attempt to resurrect it. It had not been mobile in over two decades and was more-or-less a permanent adjunct to the old facility.

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This Week @ Liberty – February 13, 2017

Hoots, Howls, and Hollers

Megan Mosby -  Managing Director

Megan Mosby -
Managing Director

I want to send out a heartfelt thank you to the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society for bestowing on Liberty Wildlife the 2016 Conservation Award.

Founded in 1968 the Arizona Wildlife Society’s mission is “To be the preeminent resource for Arizona’s community of scientists, managers, educators, students, technicians, planners and others working to manage and conserve wildlife and habitats in the state.”

The organization is dedicated to promoting management and conservation of Arizona’s wildlife resources.  Because of the organization’s reach they are able to maintain communication among professionals in the field of wildlife conservation by supporting efforts toward continuing education, providing grants and workshops with a strong emphasis on fostering student participation.

The state of Arizona is indeed lucky to have such a stalwart organization assisting in the oversight of our valuable wildlife resource and its habitat.

Liberty Wildlife couldn’t be prouder than to have been recognized by such an important and successful organization.  We thank you for your support of our programs and look forward to working with you in whatever ways we are able to dovetail our activities.

Thank you!

This Week @ Liberty

Posted by Terry Stevens - Operations Director

Posted by Terry Stevens
- Operations Director

The intake total is now at 222.

As we go to press tonight, another California condor was brought in. I hope to have an update on the bird next week. It’s one we have seen before which is disheartening, but at least we are able to keep providing these birds with what they need in terms of care.
Great horned owls are breeding as we speak, and it shows in the number of these that come in for help.
This is also the time of year for a great influx of cotton tails, both injured adults and orphan baby bunnies.
We are doing more tours now as the word gets out that we offer this form of interactivity with the public, and our usual outreach education programs are also going on full tilt.
To cap off the week,, Boy Scouts from Troop 869 were here as a team to build a  platform for our Education hand-feeders! Lets take a look at the activity…

Joanie examines a new GHO intake

Joanie examines a new GHO intake

Treatment begins at once

Treatment begins at once

This GHO was rescued in the Globe area and was brought in presenting an injured wing. The bird was capable of limited flight which gave the R&T volunteer (Anna Ouztz) an interesting challenge in apprehension, but she finally prevailed. The owl is awaiting further examination and possible x-rays.

Janice holds another GHO for Denice

Janice holds another GHO for Denise

This one will join the Ed team

This one will join the Ed team

You might remember this great horned owl from a previous TW@L. He is a bit on the small side but his “horns” are remarkably large! He has a career-ending injury to his wing, but he has a bright future as an Education Ambassador with Liberty Wildlife. Look for him again once he is named and trained!

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Claudia at The Dons (photo by Kelly)

Claudia at The Dons (photo by Kelly)

Marko and Ace

Marko and Ace (photo by Kelly)

Claudia gives some sun time to Bailey

Claudia gives some sun time to Bailey (photo by Kelly)

One of the programs we do consistently each year is the Don’s Interactive Discovery Camp. Claudia writes: “It’s held near the Peralta trailhead in the Superstition mountains. As well as learning about Liberty Wildlife, and seeing our avian ambassadors up close, the children also hike, pan for gold, learn about ranching and how to lasso, plus Native American lore. The non-profit Dons of Arizona offers the experience of Arizona and Southwest history, legends and lore to Valley 4th grade students every Friday in January and February each year”

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The tours go on

The tours go on

Speaking of education, our own series of tours is progressing nicely. As word gets out, the attendance is slowly building and it gives our Ed volunteers a chance to hone their skills as presenters. We have big plans for the upcoming months so watch for announcements in this area.

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Mexican free tail bat

Mexican free tail bat

Yellow bat feeding

Yellow bat feeding

We have been experiencing a larger number of bats of all species in recent weeks. These two little guys are now in our isolation quarters until they are ready for release down the road. Have i mentioned that of the approximately four thousand species of mammals on the planet, almost a quarter of them are bats? If you can fly, you have an advantage over ground-bound animals!

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New baby bunnies

New baby bunnies

More bunnies, color coded for identification

More bunnies, color coded for identification

And as I said, we’re getting in LOTS of baby bunnies from all over. Totally cute, and unfortunately, very fragile. They all get loving care from the Medical Services volunteers each day.

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The foundation for the feeding deck is prepared

The foundation for the feeding deck is prepared

Cement mixing begins

Cement mixing begins

Troop 869 puts in some long hours

Troop 869 puts in some long hours

Careful planning and building is the rule of the day

Careful planning and building is the rule of the day

Hand feed station

Hand feed station

Some of the members of Boy Scout Troop 869 were present this weekend to build a platform for our hand-feeders to use. On Saturday they dug the footers and poured the concrete to support the deck, and on Sunday they used the Trex (recycled plastic lumber) that was donated to us last year to build the structure. The young men were helped by some of the fathers and other leaders who instructed the boys on proper engineering and construction techniques. As soon as the overhead shade material is added, it will be ready for use by the Hand Feed team.

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This Week @ Liberty – February 06, 2017

Hoots, Howls, and Hollers

Megan Mosby -  Managing Director

Megan Mosby -
Managing Director

A big thank you goes out to each of you who supported our efforts to show our stuff in the big tent at this year’s Waste Management Phoenix Open.  As always, our education team with their “ambassadors” stole the show.  Ten people deep around the booth was the fastest way to tell where we were.

Guests were wowed with information about each of the species present:  a turkey vulture, a great horned owl, a red-tailed hawk, and a bald eagle.  It is hard to deny the presence of each of these animals.  It seems like every year onlookers mention seeing the great horned owls hooting in their neighborhoods, others have related stories of seeing the red-tailed hawks doing a courtship flight overhead, and have spoken of seeing a turkey vulture cleaning road kill at the side of the highway. Their excitement and focus is undeniable.

The value of seeing wildlife up close is important in many ways.  The pull to engage first hand with such charismatic creatures is hard to deny.  It has always been my belief that people value what they see in nature once they have been vividly exposed to something as magical as a great horned owl or as majestic as a bald eagle.  There is just no way to look at nature in the same way after a first-hand interaction and that is what we provide almost every day of the year.

The other part of this dynamic is that you are never too young or too old to appreciate an up- close encounter with a wild animal.  Their beauty is undeniable.  Their energy is palpable.  Their design is perfection.  Nature has no throw-aways.  Everything is part of the plan.

And, the plan needs to be respected and protected.

This is why we do what we do.  This is why we strive to make a public appearance with our wildlife ambassadors whenever possible.  If our love and understanding was shared with the rest of our species all of our jobs would be easier.

The take away is that our job is to make you all fall in love with our neighbors who happen to be wildlife.  Our job is to make sure there is mutual respect.  Our job is to make each of you a part of the solution to the sometimes off the chart struggle that many wild animals can suffer at the hand of unknowing folks.

Again, thanks to you who helped us make it to the big tent, who helped us do our part to assist wildlife and the balance of nature.  We hope we were able to make the impact that is our intent.

This Week @ Liberty

The intake total for this year is now at 175.

Posted by Terry Stevens - Operations Director

Posted by Terry Stevens
- Operations Director

Beautiful weather prevails during the days now and this allows the coming busy time a graceful approach. Liberty once again attended the Waste Management Phoenix Open Golf Tournament (boy, that’s a mouthful!) and the crowds seemed to love our birds as always. The rate at which animals show up at the intake window has increased slightly, but the benign weather is keeping the increase manageable – for now. This is giving us time to get used to the new facility and time to train and give some experience to the newly instituted “Intake Window Volunteer” staff. It’s slow now, but it’s going to pick up noticeably in the near future. I have been covering some open shifts at the window and it has mostly been small birds and of late, cotton tail bunnies. The larger birds are being brought in by the Rescue and Transport people, as the system was designed. Unlike the Game of Thrones ominous prediction that “Winter is coming,” we all know that “Baby Bird Season is Coming!”

Kestrel with "shoe"

Kestrel with “shoe” (photo by Dr.Wyman)

Another kestrel with an eye injury

Another kestrel with an eye injury

Kestrels are some of the cutest (as well as the most ubiquitous) raptors in North America. Consequently, we get quite a few of these diminutive falcons in for medical treatment each year. This year is starting off the same way, including these two little girls. One has an eye injury that we hope will not be career threatening, and the other has a leg/foot issue that it is hoped will be remedied by the application of a corrective “shoe” to straighten things out. Time will tell in both instances.

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A beautiful merlin comes in

A beautiful merlin comes in

Getting ready for X-ray

Getting ready for X-ray

Dan and Anna perform the radiology

Dan and Anna perform the radiology

Fractured radius merlin

The radiograph reveals a fractured ulna

Another small falcon we see not nearly as frequently as the kestrel is the merlin (Falco Columbarius). One came in last week with a wing injury which, by virtue of our new digital X-ray unit, was quickly confirmed as having a fractured ulna. Hopefully this early diagnosis (and the fact that the fracture is mid-shaft) will lead to a successful outcome of the treatment.

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Peggy explains Turkey vultures at the WMPO

Peggy explains Turkey vultures at the WMPO

Aurora is always a star at the Golf Tournament

Aurora is always a star at the Golf Tournament

Each year Liberty Wildlife puts on a booth at the Waste Management Phoenix Open golf tournament. It is a good opportunity to display some of our ambassadors to the public and to do some education as to who’s backyard in which we live and what we can do to mitigate our impact on the world around us.

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Orphan brothers (photo by Jesse Brown)

Orphan brothers (photo by Jesse Brown)

These two über cute bunny siblings came in for care after their nest was unearthed by some construction equipment at the site of the Renaissance Festival on the far east side. They joined a couple others of nearly the same age and will be cared for by the best Liberty has to offer to them and ALL Arizona wildlife!

*********************************SAVE THE DATE!!!***************************

PA170524-001 INVITATION Liberty Wildlife Wishes For Wildlife

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This Week @ Liberty – January 30, 2017

Hoots, Howls, and Hollers

Megan Mosby -  Managing Director

Megan Mosby -
Managing Director

Every year we are obliged to provide end of the year reports attached to each of the permits that we have with the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Arizona Game and Fish.  They are always very impressive as they account for the “numbers and activities” that we provide to the community and to wildlife in a given year.  This year I want to start by bragging on our Non –Eagle Feather Repository.  The accomplishments of this program are staggering when you consider it is one very part time employee (Robert Mesta) and a very hard working volunteer, (Mare VanDyke).  I am copying their accomplishments in total as each category breaks a record. Each year it gets better.  The service to the Native American community grows annually and the impact on the black market in feathers is daunted.  Because we can provide, with the help of agencies and private donors, feathers to Native Americans for their religious and cultural uses, they are no longer pushed toward black market access to feathers that are critical for their religious and cultural activities.  See below the results of their efforts.

Liberty Wildlife Non-Eagle Feather Repository Program

2600 E. Elwood St,
Phoenix, AZ 85040
2016 Annual Report
In 2010 Liberty Wildlife in collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 2, established the Liberty Wildlife Non-Eagle Feather Repository Program (LWNEFR). Its mission is to provide Native Americans from Federally recognized tribes with a source of non-eagle feathers from Federally regulated migratory birds for religious and ceremonial purposes. 

LWNEFR Guiding Principles

Liberty Wildlife recognizes the significance of feathers and/or parts of birds to Native Americans and will operate the LWNEFR with sensitivity to Native American religious and ceremonial needs. 

Liberty Wildlife will insure that all feathers, carcasses or parts will be stored and handled in a manner that will maintain their integrity.

Liberty Wildlife will insure that all feathers, carcasses or parts donated to the LWNEFR come from authorized sources.

Liberty Wildlife will distribute feathers, carcasses or parts equitably on a first come first  serve basis.

LWNEFR Inventory

In 2016, the LWNEFR inventory included up to 114 species of hawks, owls, falcons, condor, vulture, corvids, water-birds, shorebirds, upland birds and songbirds.  This number of species feathers, carcasses or parts fluctuates depending on the number and type of species that come into the repository and species that are sent out.  A complete list of repository species is attached.

LWNEFR Donors

In addition to the feathers, carcasses or parts that come from Liberty Wildlife, in 2016 the LWNEFR received donations from 35 donors; the top three donors were 1.) wildlife rehabilitators, 2.) Arizona Game and Fish Department, and 3.) USFWS.  These donors provided the LWNEFR with 65 different bird species.  A complete list of donors and species are attached.

2016 Operational Summary

In 2016 the LWNEFR received 320 applications for feathers, carcasses or parts, we filled 265 of those applications – 83% of applications received.  A complete list of applications received in 2016 is attached.

In addition, we filled 190 older applications submitted between 2013 to 2015.

In 2016 the LWNEFR filled a total of 510 applications; 42.5/month, 10.6/week.

In 2016, 37 different species were sent out. 

The top five species, from most to least, include;

1.) RTHA (red-tailed hawk), 2.) COHA (Cooper’s hawk), 3.) GHOW (great horned owl), 4.) HAHA (Harris’s hawk), 5.) CACO (California condor).

In 2016, 81 tribes from 24 states received feathers, carcasses or parts.

The top five tribes, from most to least include; 1.) Navajo, 2.) Hopi, 3.) Sioux, 4.) Klamath, 5.) Yurok.

The top five states, from most to least include; 1.) Arizona, 2.) New Mexico, 3.) California, 4.) Oklahoma, 5.) Wisconsin.

This Week @ Liberty

The intake total for this year is now at 173.

Posted by Terry Stevens - Operations Director

Posted by Terry Stevens
- Operations Director

The weather is pretty nice, albeit a bit cool in the morning and overnight. In another couple of months, we’ll all long for the days of cool evenings and crisp mornings. We’re slowly easing into a rhythm at the new facility. Condors, great horned owls, red tails, peregrines – all the usual suspects…er, patients! And as always the level of care is top notch as evinced by the success of some of our recent intakes. Who would have thought that a hawk with seven or eight gunshot wounds would live to fly again?
We have been getting a lot of hummingbirds in and the contrast between them and the condors never ceases to amaze anyone who sees them, myself included!
Since we have the capability of doing our own radiology now, I have included some interesting slides from the X-ray room. It underscores just how critical it is to be able to accomplish this on a nearly real-time basis. we use every tool we can from the arsenal of modern medical science.

GSW red tail recovers

GSW red tail recovers

Ready to get on with life out of the crosshairs

Ready to get on with life out of the crosshairs

Remember that X-ray from last week of the RTH with the 8 pellets? Well, he wasn’t turned into a newt, but “he got better!” (For all you Monti Python fans…)
In just a short time at Liberty Wildlife, this courageous young bird seems ready and eager to return to work as an apex predator in the Arizona skies. Two thumbs up for the Med Services team!

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Little owl with big horns!

Little owl with big horns!

Another GSW victim

Another GSW victim

And just when you thought it was safe for owls and hawks, this diminutive great horned owl comes in with, you guessed it, another pellet wound! Once again, the value of having x-ray capability on site is invaluable in determining the cause of inconclusive symptoms. This allows the Med Services team to properly plan treatment from day one.

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Little ruddy duck with crippling injury

Little ruddy duck with crippling injury

Sometimes, the damage is so devastating that you look at the image and wince. This pretty little ruddy duck has a career ending fracture of his humerus and hopefully can be placed with an educational facility when the injury has healed. with all those fragments, no repair to his shoulder is possible.

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Holly and Amyra bring a condor in for treatment

Holly and Amyra bring a condor in for treatment

Holly and Amyra hold the big girl for Alex

Holly and Amyra hold the big girl for Alex

Holding on tightly

Holding on tightly

We’re still treating the two California condors in our care. Each day, they are brought in, weighed, examined, and given medicine and fluids to overcome the effects of lead poisoning. Beyond the chelation treatments, the protocol is to keep them warm, hydrated, and fed in an attempt to build up their weight which will help them survive. All this could be prevented by using ammunition other than lead for hunting in the areas known to be inhabited by California condors.

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Peregrine gets great care (photo by Alexa)

Peregrine gets great care (photo by Alexa)

This shot was submitted a while back in December but since I have some rarely used e-mail addresses, I didn’t get it until last week. In any case, the shot was too good to pass up and here is another shot of the peregrine we have been treating for a while. (Thanks Alexa!)

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Laura has a birthday

Laura has a birthday

We try to recognize accomplishments of our volunteers and staff as best we can. Having said that, I am a firm believer that passing a birthday is truly an accomplishment! So when  our Education scheduler (and general Jill of all trades) Laura Hackett had a B’day last week, we had to recognize the fact that she celebrated it with us. Keep that smile, Laura. Thanks for being here!

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This Week @ Liberty – January 23, 2017

Hoots, Howls, and Hollers

Megan Mosby -  Managing Director

Megan Mosby -
Managing Director

So, you are minding your own business when suddenly you are confronted with an injured or orphaned wild animal.  There is no way you are going to turn your back and walk away ignoring the possibility of hours of suffering and the eventual demise of the animal.  No, you take the bull by the horns and make the rescue.  If it is beyond your capacity or if you have fears, you start the search for help.  If you are lucky of if you have done this before, you call Liberty Wildlife’s Hotline (480-998-5550).

Depending on the case, either you are directed to bring the rescue in or a rescue volunteer is dispatched to pick it up for delivery to our facility.

What you need to know follows, and it couldn’t be said better than the words of Terry Stevens.  It goes like this:

Thank you!  This animal got its best chance for survival when you made the phone call to Liberty Wildlife.  You have done a commendable service for it and all wildlife in Arizona by caring enough to make this effort.  Now, your job is done and ours begins.  Liberty’s well-trained staff and volunteers will do their best to take the next step in this animal’s journey back to health and freedom.  They will attend to the necessary medical requirements of the animal, care for it during its recovery, and hopefully, release it when it again becomes healthy enough to be viable in the wild.

Because Liberty Wildlife takes in over 6,500 animals per year, our volunteers’ time is a precious commodity.  In order to devote this limited resource to the task of treatment and rehabilitation, we are unable to provide personal updates as to the medical status of individual animals.  We hope you understand this limitation.  Please know that they are in the best of hands and will receive outstanding care administered with skill and love.  Again, thank you for doing your part in providing this animal the chance you have given it today.

Remember to be aware of your surroundings; be alert to issues with the wildlife that shares your neighborhood and be willing to take the time and effort to help.  We will take over at that point and do the best we can to return the animal you assisted back into the wild.  We couldn’t do this without your help.

Thank you for caring.

This Week @ Liberty

Posted by Terry Stevens - Operations Director

Posted by Terry Stevens
- Operations Director

The intake total so far this year is 106.

And then the rains came…  Let’s all try to remember this weather in July! And after all, it did just show us the real meaning of “Waterfront property!”
In other news…we opened up for our first public tours last weekend and it went extremely well. The crowds are small, but the word is slowly getting out and should grow with time. In the meantime, we are learning the ropes of being open to the public and how to refine our program. Both the people attending and the volunteers presenting had a good time – and the animals seemed to take it all in stride.
The digital X-ray unit is proving its worth with timely radiographs, allowing for speedy diagnoses and treatment. And the intakes and rescues come in…

Yes we do have waterfront property

Yes we do have waterfront property

The rains presented a swollen Rio Salado on the north side of the new Liberty facility. We found out about some drainage issues that will soon be remedied, but gave the waterfowl a fun day in their enclosure.  There’s nothing happier than a duck in a few inches of water!

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Ed and Cynthia examine a great blue heron

Ed and Cynthia examine a great blue heron

Jan applies special bandage to a  GHO

Jan applies special bandage to a GHO

Our volunteer Medical Service staff are enjoying the roominess and cleanliness of our new facilities. From the Sunday crew (above with a GBH) to the Tuesday Vet Night staff, everyone is slowly settling into the new digs. The great horned owl presented an electrical burn on its wing so Jan used a special bandage/dressing designed for burns to good advantage.

Holly and the Reeve's pheasant

Holly and the Reeve’s pheasant (photo by Patricia Quinn-Ortiz)

John Glitsos rescued and brought in a Reeve’s pheasant that had flown into someone’s window pane. Most likely a pet, the Reeve’s is a beautiful bird native to central and eastern China. This pheasant is mentioned in the 2008 edition of Guinness World Records for having the longest natural tail feather of any bird species. John had to cut a hole in his rescue box to fit the bird in without damaging his tail! The bird is still in treatment for trauma sustained in the window collision.

Red Tail with multiple gun shot wounds

Red Tail with multiple gun shot wounds

Yet another red tail, victim of someone who pumped eight projectiles into the hapless bird. REALLY?!?! C’mon people, let’s use our heads – and our hearts…

Roadrunner that ingested a fish hook

Roadrunner that ingested a fish hook

This road runner ate something that had been involved with some fishing gear, including a large hook.  The unfortunate bird swallowed the hook which became hopelessly entangled in his internal organs. Sadly the bird could not be saved and proves once more the importance of not leaving fishing equipment in the environment.

Raccoon head with multiple fractures

Raccoon head with multiple fractures

This raccoon came in recently with some head trauma, possibly from a car collision. His skull is fractured in several places and he is still fighting to survive. This once again points up the value of having radiology capability on site.

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Cindy with Veto

Cindy with Veto (photo by Barry Ziegler)

One of the upsides of doing programs on-site (see below) is the Education volunteers don’t have to spread astro-turf under the birds to protect carpets and floors (even if the tarps DO blend in with the ambient color schemes!)

Linda has an attentive audience

Linda has an attentive audience

Lisa presents a burrowing owl

Lisa presents a burrowing owl

The public tours debuted last week and despite poor weather, the folks who braved threatening skies and cold temperatures had a great time.

Anita Roman  from Cannel 10 spreads her wings! (photo by unk)

Anita Roman from Cannel 10 spreads her wings! (photo by Laura Hackett)

Several of the people here for the tours said they heard about Liberty on Channel 10 earlier in the week. Day time reporter Anita Roman was on hand to do a morning spot which went over very well with local audiences. The word about Liberty is getting out!

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This Week @ Liberty – January 16, 2017

 Hoots, Howls, and Hollers

Megan Mosby -  Managing Director

Megan Mosby -
Managing Director

Saturday we officially became part of the American Kestrel Partnership, a project of the Peregrine Fund. Biologist Kurt Licence of Arizona Game and Fish and Brian Grimaldi installed our very own kestrel breeding box with the hope that we will be able to attract a pair of kestrels this breeding season. Kurt explained:

The American kestrel (Falco sparverious) nestbox project is

Kurt and Brian  work on the kestrel box

Kurt and Brian work on the kestrel box

 an effort to utilize citizen scientists and research partnerships as the primary driving force to monitor trends in Arizona’s kestrel populations. This project is proposed in response to population declines and unreliable data across much of North America and Arizona as documented by US Geological Survey’s Breeding Bird SurveyNational Audubon Society’s Christmas Bird Count, nestbox monitoring programs (Smallwood et al. 2009), and Raptor Population Index (migration counts). This project will contribute more reliable data on kestrel demography in Arizona and utilize a valuable and free resource of citizen scientists.

According to Kurt The process will be to reduce the activity in the area around the box, monitor it with binoculars and hope a lucky pair of kestrels take a liking to it. If a pair does use it, we will need someone to use a ladder to peek inside about once a week after we strongly suspect eggs have been laid.

So, there you have it. Keep your fingers crossed that a pair of kestrels locate the box, grab the territory and start doing their kestrel thing. It will be great fun to observe the process. It will be great to encourage the productivity or the species. It will be great to have pretty little falcons taking on the insect and rodent population in our hood.

Wait, watch, wonder!

This Week @ Liberty

Posted by Terry Stevens - Operations Director

Posted by Terry Stevens
- Operations Director

The intake total is now at 79.

We’re slowly whittling away at the stuff that has to be done concerning the move. Next weekend we’ll be going back to the Scottsdale operation to salvage some more small items (and some larger items – like a couple of enclosures!) In the meantime, we finally have the walk-in freezer up and running and WOW, it is C-O-L-D! We’ll be adding some wheeled racks this week so Alex has a place for all the frozen food we order and go through each month. We acquired another golf cart to facilitate movement around the new campus, and we have installed a kestrel nest box on the Peace Trail fence. The Education team is going full speed with outreach programs, and the guided tours began last weekend. Plus, people are finding the Elwood St. address and bringing in injured animals which are logged in at the new intake window. As Sonny and Cher used to say, “The beat goes on!” (For the Millennials out there who don’t know who they were, go ask your parents!)

Joanie and peregrine

Joanie and peregrine

The injured peregrine is still under treatment. It seems Joanie is always deeply in conversation with the birds she holds on Vet Night. She obviously has a great “nest-side” manner…!

Lainey and Candace rescue a cottontail

Lainey and Candace rescue a cottontail (photo by Kathy – the mother)

Cotton tail swimmer

Cotton tail swimmer

Two very concerned young wildlife enthusiasts brought in this cottontail rabbit yesterday. They found the bunny in their backyard and when they went to pick him up, he jumped into the pool and was swimming away when they rescued him. He was placed in a brooder to dry off and warm up in. He will be examined during Vet Night on Tuesday afternoon for any further treatment and care. – Nice job girls!

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Kurt and Brian install a home for kestrels

Kurt and Brian install a home for kestrels

Brian checks the box

Brian checks the box

Kestrel box installed by Kurt and Brian. See the story above in HHH.

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The freezer is freezing

The freezer is freezing – REALLY!

Frozen food

Frozen food being organized by Daily Care Coordinator Alex

It’s finally freezing! Not outside, but in the walk-in freezer that Tim and I assembled last summer. Something we have needed for a long time, this modern high quality unit was  purchased from a company in New York that makes this type of freezer for the U.S. Navy. We can now get food in sufficient amounts to obtain quantity discounts on frozen quail, mice, fish, and other food for our rehabbing birds and mammals.

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Horse Sense show

Horse Sense show (photo by Linda)

Doris displays a peregrine

Doris displays a peregrine (photo by Linda)

Linda Scott writes: “Horsense is a 5 week program for 4 and 5th graders that takes place at Old McDonalds Ranch in Scottsdale.  The program is a partnership between Old McDonald’s Ranch, Healthworld, Scottsdale Charros, and the Scottsdale Unified School District   Through their equine program and guest presenters Horsense teaches kids about respect, responsibility, development of character, and making good choices. The Liberty Wildlife Education program has been  honored to participate for several years.” 

Marko and Sherrill have an eager audience

Marko and Sherrill have an eager audience (photo by Kelly)

At another show this weekend, Marko with Hedwig, Sherrill with Veto presented at the Outdoor Family Adventure Day at White Tank Mountain Regional Park. Liberty is almost always the biggest hit at these and any shows we attend.

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New golf cart

New golf cart

To supplement our “fleet” of electric transport vehicles, this road-legal golf cart was donated by Doris and Mike Pedersen who are Florida Gator and Washington Huskie fans (obviously!). It arrived from Goodyear last Friday and after some small modifications (removing the golf bag holders and adding a passenger seat) will provide a great  addition to our inventory of useful equipment at our new larger facility.

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This Week @ Liberty – January 09, 2017

Hoots, Howls, and Hollers

Megan Mosby -  Managing Director

Megan Mosby -
Managing Director

On my morning walk the air was dank and the sky was dark but overcast with clouds. The silence was penetrated by the hoots of a dark time predator, the great horned owl. I do the same thing that I do every time it happens…I scan the sky for the silhouette of the owl as it hoots from my neighbor’s chimney to find its mate or announce its territory.

It reminded me that the baby time was upon us again. The eagles are down and video cams keep those who watch up to date on the hatchings or not of the eggs laid heralding the next generation. It is such a happening time of year as far as wildlife goes.

There are some reminders that I harp on every year and here I go again.

If you know that you have nesting birds around you…stay back. Approach only from afar by means of binoculars. Do not physically penetrate their space. It is a sensitive time and frightened parents might be forced to abandon the nest. Once the eggs hatch there is such an investment that the parents are less likely to abandon and might become more aggressive so just stay away and get your jollies by watching the video cams.

Another reminder has to do with ducks. It might be a little early for the mallard families to start their nesting behaviors but very soon they will start checking out your yards for the safest place to lay their eggs and raise a family…unfortunately hatching and leading the cute babies straight for your pool. Trust me, you do not want that to happen. I suggest you make your yard a not so pleasant place to be…discourage kindly any efforts to find your home their home. You will thank me.

And lastly for now…do not start trimming your trees. Any efforts to locate a safe place to build a nest depends on the existing flora. Heaven forbid you should actually undo all of the efforts of some hard working avian neighbor. The verdins outside my office window bring me hours of delight as I watch them flitting around the palo verde tucking twigs and sticks into a neat little inverted basket. I watch secretly from my window and look forward to the arrival of babies.

Yes, the season is upon us. Respect your wildlife neighbors. Give them space to do their thing. And enjoy the benefits of another bountiful wildlife season.

This Week @ Liberty

Posted by Terry Stevens - Operations Director

Posted by Terry Stevens
- Operations Director

The intake tally for the year is now at 46.

The new year is taking off slowly, but the intakes are picking up as the days pass. I keep telling the Window Volunteers (a new position at Liberty) to enjoy the slow time now as in a couple of months, the lines will begin to form at the drop off point.
Two California condors have survived thus far and their treatment continues. The golden eagle has had another operation to install another pin to support the broken bones. We’re all still working at settling into the new facility to best serve the animals in our care. It will be, as it has been all along, a process.
On the bright side, our walk-in freezer should be up and getting cold by the time you read this. That’s one more step on the long road that is Liberty Wildlife…

Laura gives some Liberty background

Laura gives some Liberty background

Kelly and Marko conduct a walk around the Education Trail

Kelly and Marko conduct a walk around the Education Trail

Newly offered to the public are guided tours of the Rob and Melani Walton Campus of Liberty Wildlife. Designed to educate the public as to our role in Arizona wildlife rehabilitation and environmental sustainability, these 90 minute walks around the facility allow the public to see and experience the processes the animals go through as we provide medical care and long term rehabilitation services for them, as well as some hands-on educational opportunities to the people on the tours. Our Education volunteers are doing a marvelous job of both entertaining and educating the adults and children who sign up for these scheduled events several days a week.

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Golden eagle's fractured humerus prior to surgery

Golden eagle’s fractured humerus prior to surgery

The same injury after stabilizing pins were installed

The same injury after stabilizing pins were installed

The beautiful eagle is improving slowly

The beautiful eagle is improving slowly

The golden eagle that came in a few weeks ago has again had surgery to install pins in her wing to stabilize the fractured humerus. The break is very close to the elbow joint complicating the healing process and making repair to the wing exceedingly difficult. This latest surgery was performed by Dr. Lamb (a new volunteer veterinarian experienced in avian species!) on New Year’s Eve after the first pin that was installed began to migrate (move) inside the bone. This latest iteration seems to have been more successful and the bird is generally improving. Updates will follow in the weeks ahead.

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Craig with an eared grebe

Craig with an eared grebe

This looks like a happy bird!

This looks like a happy bird!

Recently we received an eared grebe that came to us after spending some time with some other wildlife rehabilitation folks up between Payson and Pine Top. It appeared to be a very young juvenile who was having difficulty eating on his own.  After giving him some much needed sustenance and rest, he was deemed fit for release. Yesterday, Sunday, Craig took him out and let him go free at the Gilbert Water Ranch and he seems to be getting along well.

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Pano of the new ICU

Pano of the new ICU

Just thought I’d throw this in there. If you remember our former home (and who could forget!) the ICU – most often referred to as the “Bird Room” – was one small, crowded room that also served as surgery, triage, log-in, and anteroom to the one and only restroom!  We have indeed come a long way!

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This Week @ Liberty – January 02, 2017

Hoots, Howls, and Hollers

Megan Mosby -  Managing Director

Megan Mosby -
Managing Director

Writing the date is my first real recognition that the new year is upon us….and as the old saying goes…it is out with the old and in with the new.  Never has that saying had as much meaning to me as it does this year. It feels so gratifying to look at our accomplishments, to recollect our move, to settle into our new home.

In the process, some things didn’t make the cut and therefore, didn’t make the move and that is okay.  It is a time of looking at what is working and what isn’t and realizing that it is okay to jettison things that need to be let go of, although the decision process isn’t ever easy.

We have done our molting and shedding and are now all shiny and new.  Yay!

Now the job is to look around and see how we can become the very best version of our new self.  How can we do our job better on behalf of the natural world and its inhabitants.  How can we better serve our clients, YOU, how can we charge forward and allow our mission to succeed.  We must be the very best that we can be in everything we do.  That’s all.

We need to all commit to renewing our sense of purpose, to being stronger in body, mind, and spirit.  We need to set our standards high and strive to reach the heights.  That’s all.

And when all is said and done, we need to look ourselves in the eye and decide if what we have done, are doing and will do, will in the end make a difference.  That’s all.

So, I plan to clean the clutter out of my life.  I plan to see what doesn’t look like it is working as well as it should and mindfully go about chinking away at the deficits.  That’s all.

Will you join me in this endeavor?  What I do know is that we are better as a team than solo.  And, if you do choose to join the team, who knows what kind of cool stuff we could accomplish.

Say yes, that’s all.

And, Happy New Year to each of you.

This Week @ Liberty

Posted by Terry Stevens - Operations Director

Posted by Terry Stevens
- Operations Director

The intake total for this week is now 3.  The final intake tally for last year was 6583!

The year has turned and we again set a record for the number of intakes. The down side is in the last couple of weeks, we took in four California condors (yeah, it’s hunting season again…) We’re still trying very diligently to get the message out to responsible hunters to strongly consider changing to an alternative to lead ammunition. Hopefully no one thinks we are anti-hunting or anti-shooting, but we are really committed to removing lead from the environment and the major source of this element in Arizona is bullet fragments. We will continue to speak on this topic as long as the major cause of death in the Arizona population of California condors is lead poisoning.
Most of this update is on the four condors that arrived in the waning weeks of 2016 although I also put in a couple of more upbeat pics to start the new year. Hope everybody had a safe and happy holiday season.

The first two condors arrive (photo by Laura)

The first two condors arrive (photo by Laura)

Lead poisoning is a cruel, painful sickness

Lead poisoning is a cruel, painful sickness

Tim and Alex help jan hang the IV fluids

Tim and Alex help Jan hang the IV fluids

Dr. Wyman and Jan begin to administer the anesthesia

Dr. Wyman and Jan begin to administer the anesthesia

Alex holds the condor as the anesthetic takes effect

Alex holds the condor as the anesthetic takes effect

Sara supports the intubation line and the bird's head

Sara supports the intubation line and the bird’s head

Dr. Orr opens the crop as she is watched intently by some young future volunteers

Dr. Orr inserts the intubation tube as she is watched intently by some young future volunteers

We now truly have a "surgical theater" to watch the rehabilitation as it occurs

We now truly have a “surgical theater” to watch the rehabilitation as it occurs

Each year at Liberty Wildlife, the start of the hunting season heralds the arrival of sick California Condors, each with some elevated level of lead in their blood. The usual first sign on this is “crop stasis” wherein the involuntary muscles that force food from the crop into the stomach cease to function. They are hungry and will eat, but gain no nourishment as the food never gets to where is can be processed. By the time they are brought in to us, they are seriously underweight and dehydrated, a condition that only exacerbates the effects of the lead. Without treatment, the bird will certainly die. The chelation treatment, which can take weeks or even months, involves administering an element into the bloodstream to which the lead will bind. The lead is then excreted by the kidneys, lowering the lead level over time. It is hard on the animal and sadly, some condors have been through the procedure more than once. And it is ALL preventable if people would just use ammunition other than lead…

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Anasazi (with Max) accepts a donation from Jackie Lee and Cornerstone Advisors

Jackie Lee presents a donation from Cornerstone Advisors  to Anasazi (and Max)

A former volunteer at Liberty, Jackie Lee, contacted us recently in regards to her efforts to obtain donations for Liberty. She works for Cornerstone Advisors which allows each employee to select a charity which then receives $750. Along with her personal donation, she convinced 8 other Cornerstone folks to donate to us as well and was therefore able to bring in 9 checks for $750 each. Two of the people who selected Liberty live out of state – in New York and Texas!  Thank you to Jackie, her friends, and Cornerstone Advisors for this generous donation!

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Christmas goodies in the Volunteer breakroom

Christmas goodies in the Volunteer breakroom

Part of what makes Liberty Wildlife work year after year is the team spirit of our volunteer family. This shows up as a wonderful array of snacks and goodies brought in not just at Christmas time, but throughout the year. There always seems to be an endless supply of cookies, candy, and cakes, many of which are home made. (No wonder it’s not easy to lose weight around here!) Thanks to everyone who for these thoughtful treats that we all enjoy!

 

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This Year @ Liberty – December 26, 2016

Hoots, Howls, and Hollers

Megan Mosby Managing Director

Megan Mosby
Managing Director

 

 

 

 

and

This Week @ Liberty

Posted by Terry Stevens - Operations Director

Posted by Terry Stevens
- Operations Director

The intake total is now at 6552.

I have once again strung together some of the visuals from this past year, our 35th and final year at the Scottsdale facility. The memories of what took place on that small piece of  Earth over the past three and a half decades will stay in our hearts forever. It could never be adequately recounted in a 2 minute, 32 second video, so I just picked, almost at random, some of last year’s TW@L photos to represent our final few months there. From here, we march proudly into the future…

Please enjoy it, and have a very Happy New Year from TW@L, HHH, and all the wonderful volunteers and staff at Liberty Wildlife!

This Year @ Liberty 2016

(click this link for video)

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This Week @ Liberty – December 12, 2016

Hoots, Howls, and Hollers

Megan Mosby -  Managing Director

Megan Mosby -
Managing Director

It is the end of the year so quickly and time for me to make a plea for your end of the year giving plan, but here’s the deal.

You don’t have to consider Liberty Wildlife in your philanthropy if:

  1. You aren’t interested in nurturing the nature of Arizona.
  2. You don’t care that the wildlife that shares our world gets the best care possible if needed.
  3. You don’t care about an organization that provides on-site and outreach education for the entire state…to the tune of over 820 programs a year.
  4. You don’t care about an organization that is teaching sustainability to every visitor by using our beautiful new building as a teaching tool, while conserving resources including donations.
  5. You don’t care that our unique Non-Eagle Feather Repository has sent over 3000 feather orders for Native Americans to use in ceremony, regalia, and religious practices which saves wild birds from black market reaping.
  6. You don’t care that our Research and Conservation team has mitigated for negative or potential negative impact between wildlife and civilization and communities’ needs.
  7. You don’t care if our weekly blog, This Week at Liberty and Hoots, Howls, and Hollers, our monthly e magazine, Nature News, and our annual magazine, WingBeats continue to be produced and circulated.
  8. You don’t care that Liberty Wildlife provides internships and residencies to students from all over the world.
  9. You don’t care that thousands of individuals have been privileged to be trained to work directly with native animals.
  10. You don’t care that over 140 species are cared for annually.

I mean, really, if you don’t care about all or any of those things, perhaps you can find someone locally who does more…but I don’t think so.  And key to this entire decision is to make a decision to give locally…where it counts…for your own surroundings, your own services needed, your own personal experience.

Well ok, I guess giving to Liberty Wildlife is a particularly good idea as you consider your personal philanthropy this year.  As you can see we do an awful lot with your donations.

This Week @Liberty

Posted by Terry Stevens - Operations Director

Posted by Terry Stevens
- Operations Director

The intake total for this year is now at 6476.

Things are calming down slightly after the three big events we held over the past few weeks and we ‘re starting to develop a routine at the new facility. The staff and volunteers are learning where things are and what we have to work with. With so much more space, we’re having to map out where individual animals are being held so the daily care people can find who they’re looking for. It’s a new feeling to have so much room to work with! But with all the new things happening, its reassuring to know some things never change, like the level of care and concern the animals all get when they arrive at Liberty’s window. As we approach the end-of-the-year holidays, let’s take a brief look at what we were doing this past week…

A visiting shrike

A visiting shrike

Add another specie to the ever growing list of birds and animals seen around the new Rob and Melani Walton Campus of Liberty Wildlife – this loggerhead shrike spent some time around the wetlands last week, long enough for me to get out my big glass and grab a couple shots of him as he hunted. The Loggerhead Shrike is a songbird with a raptor’s habits, preying on insects, birds, lizards, and small mammals. Lacking a raptor’s talons, Loggerhead Shrikes skewer their kills on thorns or barbed wire or wedge them into tight places for easy eating. These activities have earned him the name “butcher bird.”

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Jan and Holly tend to an injured peregrine

Gail holds while Jan and Holly tend to an injured peregrine

A peregrine falcon arrived last week with a serious injury to his wing.  Jan and Holly worked on the fractured humerus but as the extensive damage is very close to the elbow joint, the likelihood of this beautiful bird taking to the air again is doubtful. There is a down side to being the world’s fastest living organism: the greater your velocity when you collide with an immovable object, the more kinetic energy has to be dissipated (K=1/2Mv²), usually by bones breaking – especially light, hollow bones. Hopefully the bird will survive and possibly become either an education ambassador or a foster parent.

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A cute ruddy duck

A cute little ruddy duck

Someone's pet oriole

A Bullock’s oriole that was someone’s pet

Two more smaller birds that are in our care as of last week, this very cute ruddy duck with a possible head trauma, and this bullock’s oriole who has been kept as a pet for 8 years. The duck is doing better but is still under observation. The oriole is very pale as you might expect for a pretty songbird held captive in a cage for so long. In the west, this oriole is common in summer in forest edge, farmyards, leafy suburbs, isolated groves, and streamside woods, especially in cottonwood trees. Being held for so long, the bird is not releasable and will live out his days in our care.

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Seriously injured kestrel

Seriously injured kestrel

Another fast flying injury

Another fast flying injury

The little male kestrel and the sharp-shinned hawk probably both suffered the same type of injury as the peregrine – collision damage while hunting. The kestrel’s injuries are very serious and his prognosis is guarded at best. The sharp-shinned hawk is in somewhat better condition but time will tell. It is a young bird and that always helps when it comes to healing broken bones.

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Jan enters data for another X-ray

Jan enters data for another X-ray

One of the big advantages to having our own radiology capability is that animals don’t have to wait for their exam. In the past, if we didn’t have the time or the opportunity to drive injured animals 20-30 miles to a facility that offered to allow us to use their x-ray units, the time spent waiting could mean the difference between a full recovery after immediate treatment and a less-than optimal outcome. Now, the images we generate can be sent to specialists or to other displays at Liberty for analysis and recommendations for treatment in a real-time environment.

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The little raccoon goes outside

The little raccoon goes outside (photo by Stacey)

The young raccoon that arrived a several weeks ago is doing better.  Presenting evidence of a head injury, he had been in the new mammal room until last week when he was moved outside, much to his delight. All around better care is what we are able to give all the arrivals at the Rob and Melani Walton Campus of Liberty Wildlife.

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Libby and I watch the festivities (photo  by Laura)

Libby and I watch the festivities at Highland Lakes (photo by Laura)

Libby meets one of the veterans

Libby meets one of the veterans (photo by Laura)

Posing with some of the kids (photo  by Laura)

Posing with some of the kids (photo by Laura)

Libby went with on a program last week to the Highland Lakes Elementary School with Laura and me. It was a day to honor veterans and it was a moving ceremony. The kids were terrific – well behaved and very respectful of the veterans, one of whom was 100 years old. As always, Libby was a perfect lady and posed with everyone.

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A first grader with a big heart is a scientist in the making! (image by Laura Hackett)

A first grader with a big heart is a scientist in the making! (image by Laura Hackett)

Laura Hackett sent this to me today and I had to include it in this weeks blog. Laura says:

“I had to share because I am so proud of this girl.  She is the daughter of a friend and she has always loved animals.  She and I could talk for hours about the animals I cared for while I was still at the zoo. She had to do a service project for her 1st grade class and she wanted to do something for us.  I showed her around the facility and she loved the idea of talking about pollinators.  So she created a worksheet for kids her age to learn more about pollinators!!!”

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Our annual Volunteer's Christmas tree

Our annual Volunteer’s Christmas tree

In honor of the upcoming Christmas holiday, I’m including this shot of our annual Volunteer’s Christmas tree (with apologies to Charles Schultz and Charlie Brown!)

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A special offer and announcement from Ken Milward

By just using our ID badges Boyce Thompson Arboretum has agreed to offer us free passage to the card holder from this December though May of next year.  Each additional  guest will be required to pay the normal fees $10 for adults and $5 for children.  Boyce Thompson Arboretum is one of our Arizona Sate Parks and is the oldest arboretum west of the Mississippi having been founded in 1924. The arboretum is located just west of the town of Superior on US Highway 60.  Hours are from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM last entry will be restricted at 4:00 PM for it takes approximately an hour to complete the  main trail.

Boyce Thompson Arboretum
3765 US 60
Superior, Arizona 85273
520 639-2723

My contact was Lynnea Spencer who approached the the board of directors with this proposal and gained approval.  I have furnished them with a copy of my Liberty Wildlife ID badge and they will have that there at the cashier’s window for verification of our IDs.  They have given me some free passes that I have been distributing to our volunteers so that they may bring a guest or in the case that they do not yet have an ID badge.  I only have a limited number of these remaining on a first come basis one to each volunteer.

One of the ways that I was able to sell this to the Arboretum was that no one seems to go there alone.  I hope that our staff of volunteers enjoy this place and introduce it to many of their friends over the next few months.

If you have any further questions about this please give me a call.

Ken Milward

(If you need a Liberty ID for this – NOT the new access card – let me know. Terry Stevens)

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