This Week @ Liberty – September 14, 2015

Hoots, Howls, and Hollers

Megan Mosby

Megan Mosby

After a busy summer of helping thousands of animals and the humans that brought them in or called for our help, I thought it might be good to review a few ways that you, the appreciative community can help Liberty Wildlife.  There are many easy ways for you to give back to Liberty Wildlife for being there when you needed help.  There are things that you can do without leaving home.  Some of these things are meant to make life easier on wildlife so you and your wildlife neighbors will not need so much help.  The second list of things is designed to make sure we are there the next time you need us.  I know you have heard all of this before, but reiteration always helps.

  1. Do not prune your trees during nesting season.  Late fall early winter is the best time.
  2. Do not use sticky traps—ever.
  3. Do not put bird feeders near windows to avoid collisions of birds and glass.
  4. Develop wildlife friendly areas in your yard with native plantings.
  5. You can put baby birds back into the nest if it is safe for you to do so.  Mother will appreciate it.
  6. Pick up fishing line and other fishing detritus in parks and along waterways.
  7. Be cognizant of dangers to animals when you plan your holiday decorations.
  8. Do not put poisons out as an attempt to control rodents or other pests.
  9. Seal up holes in your eaves, roof, storage areas if you want to keep critters out.
  10. If you must give your child a bb gun, please provide lessons in ethics with the gun.

These are some very easy things to accomplish that will decrease your need to need us.

But, if you do need us, we want to be there for you.  You can insure that by doing a few things to help provide us with the resources that we need to be your community resource.  Here are a few easy ways to help without leaving home.

  1. Support our bid to be one of 6 charities at The Waste Management Phoenix Open, Birdies for Charity…look for the pop up on our web site,www.libertywildlife.org.
  2. Join us on our Cruise for Wildlife October 3rd…contact megan@libertywildlife.org.
  3. Buy a ticket, table or donate an item to Wishes for Wildlife, May 7th, 2016
  4. Donate to our capital campaign to build our new nature center…contact megan@libertywildlife.org.
  5. Ask about workplace giving and include Liberty Wildlife in your plan. Contact megan@libertywildlife.org.
  6. Join the Wings of an Eagle Legacy Circle…contact megan@libertywildlife.org
  7. Purchase a naming opportunity including bricks to the entire center.  See our web site.
  8. Utilize Amazon Smile choosing Liberty Wildlife to receive .5% of every purchase
  9. Take part in Fry’s Food Community Rewards Program. Contact alexs@libertywildlife.org.
  10. Look for our Sustaining Membership drive this fall.  Check our website for updated ways to be part of the Liberty Wildlife family.

If we all do our parts wildlife in our community will benefit…and so will we.  Join in the cause.  Now!

This Week @ Liberty

Posted by Terry Stevens

Posted by Terry Stevens

The total intake for this year is now at 5975.

This will be a big update since we had a holiday last week. What was I thinking – animals don’t have holidays!?! In any case, I got some good shots last week and several readers have sent in stuff (THANK YOU!!) so I have a lot more material than I can fit in one post. If you don’t see your submission (or things look out of order), hang in there, I’ll get to it! We had a few different animals arrive and even with Orphan Care winding down, it was a busy week, so let’s get to it!

Colorado River toad

Colorado River toad

We saw the arrival of a Colorado River toad (BUFO ALVARIUS), also known was a Sonoran Desert toad. Their deep croaking from storm drains are sometimes mistaken for a duck, much to the chagrin of the rescue volunteer sent out to rescue a trapped water fowl. These large, psychoactive animals have a varied diet including spiders, insects, snails, beetles, grasshoppers, mice, small lizards and other toads!

Sharon holds a new young TV

Sharon holds a new young TV

More than one young turkey vulture came in this year, including this kid presenting some flight (and walking) problems. He was placed in a flight enclosure with other TVs to further evaluate his condition.

Carl brings in a young raccoon

Carl brings in a young raccoon

"Are you my daddy?"

“Are you my daddy?”

Senior rescue volunteer Carl Price brought in this orphan raccoon recently. Almost too cute for words, the little guy was examined and then sent to SW Wildlife for further care. In our new home on the river, we won’t be outsourcing mammals as we will have our own facilities for handling non-feathered intakes.

Sharon and Alexa feed an injured quail (photo by Ana Ramirez)

Sharon and Alexa medicate an injured quail (photo by Ana Ramirez)

One of the few quail remaining in Orphan Care is this little guy with a damaged leg. Ana shot this great action photo of Sharon (left) and Alexa (right) administering medication to the tiny bird. This is just one example of the outstanding team work between OC and Med Services!

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And speaking of feet, this baby BCNH displayed some foot problems

And speaking of feet, this baby BCNH displayed some foot problems

Toba and Joanie make some custom orthotics

Toba and Joanie make some custom orthotics

"Do you have these in brown?"

“Do you have these in brown?”

A fledgling black-crowned night heron was exhibiting some issues with his feet last week. Toba and Joanie expertly fashioned some “shoes” to help correct his problems. Forcing his toes and feet to grow properly won’t take too much time and will make a big difference in the life of this growing bird.

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Dr. Wyman examines a barn owl's eye

Dr. Wyman examines a barn owl’s eye

OK, so barn owls can actually hunt strictly by sound if they have to, but their eyes still are great at seeing in limited light which is handy for nocturnal hunters. One barn owl that arrived not long ago displayed some vision difficulties and is in treatment for the problem. Dr. Wyman checked out the pupillary light reflex which can sometimes aid in the diagnosis of vision problems and help us give an accurate report to the eye clinic for further treatment.

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Baby barn owl is growing fast

Baby barn owl is growing fast

Real feathers coming in!

Real feathers coming in!

The late baby barn owl that Christy sent us from Sierra Vista a short while ago is doing fine overall. Eating well and putting on weight, his natal down is quickly being replaced with his first year plumage which right now are short little “blood feathers” growing from his tail and wings. He might have gotten a late start, but he’s catching up quickly!

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Dr. Becker checks a gunshot wound on a red-tailed hawk

Dr. Becker checks a gunshot wound on a young red-tailed hawk

Another .177 pellet from an air rifle

Another .177 pellet from an air rifle

Joanie helps Dr. Becker wrap the wounded bird

Joanie helps Dr. Becker wrap the wounded bird

Yet another gun-shot wounded hawk came in recently. This first year RTH was shot with a .177 cal. air rifle. .177 caliber (4.5mm) is the smallest size of pellets widely used in air guns, and is the only caliber generally accepted for formal target competition. “In hunting, the .177 is in general inferior to .22 caliber pellets as it is smaller thus causing less impact damage.” Try telling that to this young hawk, which is neither a target nor is it game. It IS, however, illegal to shoot so somebody is either too uneducated to know the law, or too stupid to know what they are shooting!

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More eye issues...

More eye issues…

Luckily, this kestrel just needed a foreign object removed b y Dr. Becker.

Luckily, this kestrel just needed a foreign object removed b y Dr. Becker.

Having three vets on Tuesday afternoon is a wonderful experience – especially for the animals. Large problems can be dealt with by skilled doctors, and small issues can be quickly identified and handled painlessly. What might have been another serious eye issue for this little kestrel turned out to be just a small foreign substance in her eye which was expertly removed on the spot by Dr. Becker alleviating a visit to the eye clinic.

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Toba checks a coopers hawk wing

Toba checks a Cooper’s hawk wing

Having a well trained and experienced group of Med Services volunteers is also a big plus for the patients. The animals are prioritized, their charts are reviewed and updated, and preliminary activity (removing bandages, getting current weights, etc) are handled by the Med Services crew in a well ordered fashion leading to a quicker completion of the evening.

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Doctor -  patient communication

Doctor – patient communication

"OK, I dont like that much"

“OK, I don’t like that much”

Still some patients handle treatment better than others, even when it’s good for them.

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Jan and Joanie help Dr. Wyman with a roadrunner

Jan and Joanie help Dr. Wyman with a roadrunner

Roadrunner gets a wrap

Roadrunner gets a wrap

Roadrunners don’t seem to come in very often, at least not when compared to GHOs and RTHs. They are really reclusive and when they do get injured, they are extremely hard to catch. Those cartoons are not entirely inaccurate when it comes to the difficulties involved with rescuing an injured roadrunner. Contrary to popular myth, they DO fly, and they are VERY fast on the ground, even with an injured leg!

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"Wolverine" duck

“Wolverine” duck

Most strange skeletal repairs...

Most strange skeletal repairs…

This mallard was rescued recently and to the surprise of the Med Services team, he had two surgical steel pins, one in each leg. We don’t know who did this to him, but the pins went right through his knees making it nearly impossible for him to walk, and then only with great pain. So far two surgeries have been unsuccessful in removing the pins and the duck (which I unofficially named “Logan” after the Wolverine character in X-men) is now awaiting surgery with Dr. Todd Driggers who offered to try to remove the steel pins. Hopefully I’ll have a happy outcome next week! Thanks for trying Dr. T!

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What’s happening at the new site?

Staking the site

Staking the site

The outline is drawn

The outline is drawn

Getting close to pouring the first concrete

Getting close to pouring the first concrete footers

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TIME TO BUY YOUR TICKETS FOR THE HOUSEBOAT WILDLIFE ADVENTURE!

Out of the Blue Houseboat

Out of the Blue Houseboat

CONTACT MEGAN AT megan@libertywildlife.org

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3 Responses to This Week @ Liberty – September 14, 2015

  1. Art Smith says:

    Looks as though someone tried to repair some problems on that duck with the skewers that would have been used for holding the critter together later……sad…….Art.

  2. Anne Peyton says:

    To add to the HHH list: Please consider leaving your pet cats inside!

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