This Week at Liberty – December 02, 2013

Hoots, Howls, and HollersMegan and Libby

This isn’t a time to make small talk.  We need your help! It is time for you to take action.  Go to the Birdies for Charity pop up and make a pledge.  Do it for your favorite education animal.  Do it for the wildlife in your yard that might need help.  Do it for the power of education about the beauty and benefits of our wildlife neighbors.  Do it so that we can present our services….all of them….at the Waste Management Phoenix Open.  We will be able to spread the value of our mission far and wide.  And, do it because we were such a huge hit last year, and we would like to repeat that experience.  We can’t do it without your help.

Dr. Orr and Jan wrap a baby bald eagle

Dr. Orr and Jan wrap a baby bald eagle

For as little as a penny a birdie at this year’s Phoenix Open (and there are usually around 1700 a year) your 17.00 will help us save the lives of eagles, owls, hawks, falcons, song birds, mammals and even reptiles that help keep the balance in nature.  Our lives would be bereft without them and each live is a value in its own….for a mere penny a birdie you can be a huge part of the solution.

And, if you feel generous you could pledge even more.  Maybe you don’t want to be limited to just the number of birdies at the Open…maybe just a set bid over 20.00 is more fitting to your desire to help the cause.  Each of the animals in This Week at Liberty have been helped by you and your generous desire to be part of the solution….do it again, please!

Hatchling baby hawk

Hatchling baby hawk

This is so easy to do.  You don’t even have to pay until next spring.  Just go now to the pop up or to our website, www.libertywildlife.org and sign up….easy, easy, easy.

Do it now.  ‘Tis the season!  Thank you from the staff, volunteers and all of the 4000 animals that we help each year, and the thousands of folks we educate each year.  What would they do without us and what would you do if there was no great place like Liberty Wildlife?  Go now.  Pledge now.  Do your part.

One last thing….please pass this on to your family and friends.  They deserve an opportunity to help also.

 

This Week at Liberty

Posted by Terry Stevens

Posted by Terry Stevens

The intake total for the year is now at 3664.

We hope you all had a great Thanksgiving Day. The holidays are a great time to think about going home, and last week a couple of birds made it through the process and got to do just that.  It’s always a good thing when we are successful in our efforts to assist animals in their struggle to survive and do what they were designed to do.  This week we look at some of our recent intakes that may have only stayed a short while but got great care while here, became healthy and were released to again be free in the skies of our great state.  With your help (see H3 above) we can continue to do more of this work so more injured natives can get the care they need in the months and years to come.

Susie and Gail check a coot

Susie and Gail check a coot

A moorhen gets the Liberty treatment

A moorhen gets the Liberty treatment

A couple of members of the Gallinule family are currently getting care in the ICU.  Both the coot and the moorhen (swamp chicken?) have some leg/foot problems they are dealing with. The moorhen is displaying some breeding markings (the red shield and the red leg bands) show he is ready to get on with the business of breeding as soon as he is fit to return to the wild!

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HaHa gets some foot work

HaHa gets some foot work

Sharpie has a wing problem

Sharpie has a wing problem

Female kestrel gets checked out

Female kestrel gets checked out

Stress bars (the white band across her tail)

Stress bars (the white band across the middle of her tail)

Some of the patients have slightly more serious problems and will have to stay with us for a bit longer. The harris’ hawk is recovering from a foot injury and needs some more time in our care.  The little (or big!) sharp-shinned hawk has a fairly serious fracture of her wing and might end up as an education bird.  She is still young so time will tell. The female kestrel has mostly healed from her initial injury but has some remarkable stress bars on her tail.  These come from acute stress – usually diet related – and cause weakness in the feather.  Because of that, we are cautiously hoping her tail will not break off at the point of the bars and we’re observing her for a bit longer.

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Western grebe passes through

Western grebe passes through

"I bet I can stab something..."

“I bet I can stab something…”

Once in a while we get a grebe at the facility. There are some in the area (both western and pied) and are found on lakes around town. When they set down on land, they can be in trouble as they need to be on water to takeoff. This western grebe that arrived last Tuesday is one of those that luckily got found by one of our rescue volunteers. After it was checked out by the medical staff and found to be otherwise healthy, it was taken back to a local lake and released. (Too bad they aren’t all that simple…)

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Young RTH gets ready for release

Young RTH gets ready for release

Hints of a red tail to come

Hints of a red tail to come

This young red-tailed hawk also responded to treatment and was deemed fit for release last week.  What was interesting was the slight red tinge to the tail feathers, hinting at the beautiful rust red coloring to come in future plumages! I’d love to see this bird again next year (only not at Liberty but soaring above the desert floor on the hunt!)

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Lift off of GHO test flight no. 1

Gail launches GHO test flight no. 1

Beautiful to see - unless you're a nocturnal rodent...

Beautiful to see – unless you’re a nocturnal rodent…

Susie initiates est flight number 2

Susie initiates test flight number 2

"What else would you like me to do?"

“What else would you like me to do?”

"Do I get to go home now?!?"

“Do I get to go home now?!?”

Both of the soggy GHOs that came in from the rain last week (see TW@L last week) were allowed to do a test flight on Tuesday before they were taken back to where they were found and released. As we suspected, their only problem was they were too wet to fly after the record-setting downpour that hit the valley. Both demonstrated beautiful flying ability and then rode with Tim down to the southwest corner of town for release back to their own established territories. I love it when a plan comes together!

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In case you didn’t get the memo….

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lquEW1egA_Y

(See you there!)

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